And the famous Shakespearean play, Romeo e Giulietta, is what brings Verona its fame.  Now, though there are no historical records of the son of Montague and the daughter of Capulet or a pair of star-crossed lovers, the families did exist.  Shakespeare got his idea for this play from an old story book (a guy who collected his short stories in a book), which is rather interesting, and begs the question if something like this actually happened.

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The brick house in the picture is the Montague’s house.  (taken 24.1.2015)

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And this is the outside of Giulietta‘s house.  (taken 24.1.2015)

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Everyone knows the famous balcony scene – well, this is the fake balcony.  In reality, this balcony was placed on the house because it was more romantic.  The actual balcony was taken off – the next picture shows what the real balcony would have looked like.  (taken 24.1.2015)

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An example of what the real balcony would be like.  (taken 24.1.2015)

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Here is beautiful Giulietta.  No, I did not touch her because 1) that is extremely gross – do you know how many germs are probably on that? and 2) there was no line – it was kind of like a free for all – not my thing.  But apparently she brings you good luck.  Oh, and the original is showcased inside the museum because people wore a hole through her.  (taken 24.1.2015)

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And this is one of the two walls of love notes to Giulietta.  I, sadly, did not write one because I forgot to.  But there’s always another weekend!  [For those of you who saw Letters to Juliet, it’s nothing like reality.]  (taken 24.1.2015)

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